Howard apologizes for foul language in postgame tirade

US goalkeeper Tim Howard took the unusual step of releasing a statement through his agent on Tuesday apologizing for his postgame comments after Saturday’s Gold Cup final, in which he blasted CONCACAF in a rare foul-mouthed tirade.

Howard said he felt disrespected by the postgame ceremony at the Rose Bowl, which Univisión sportscaster Fernando Fiore conducted mostly in Spanish. Fiore did intersperse English when presenting the US side with their runner-up medals, but that didn’t stop the US No. 1 from uncharacteristically snapping when addressing the media shortly afterwards.

“I think it was a [expletive] disgrace that the entire postmatch ceremony was held in Spanish,” Howard said on Saturday night. “You can bet your ass if we were in Mexico City, it wouldn’t be all in English.”

Howard also laughed off a CONCACAF representative’s half-hearted attempt to gather the US team together for a postgame photo in the wake of their 4-2 loss.

READ: Howard vents frustration after 4-2 loss to Mexico

On Tuesday, the veteran ‘keeper sought forgiveness for his hot temper.

Watch: Howard on Mexico loss
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“First, I would like to apologize for my language,” Howard’s statement read. “I am the father of young children, and I certainly do not believe profanity is appropriate in public comments. I was caught up in the heat of the moment.”

Howard also added that he had no problem with the ceremony being partly in Spanish, as he believes Mexico were deserving champions on the night. But he did not apologize for the sentiment behind his outburst and stands by his position.

“In any important international match with postgame ceremonies, you would hope the tournament organizers would make sure that the primary language of each participating team is used so that the participants can understand what is being said,” the statement continued. “To fail to do this is, in my opinion, disrespectful to the players.

“When this occurs on your home soil, it is particularly insulting. We, as American players, were asked to participate in a postgame ceremony at a match in Los Angeles and we are standing there trying to show good sportsmanship and yet the ceremony is going on and we are just looking at one another struggling to understand a word.

“It was, to be honest, humiliating, and I firmly believe the tournament organizers should not have put us in that position.”

A CONCACAF spokesman declined to comment further on the statement when contacted by MLSsoccer.com.